dog

Temporary suspension of walks

Due to the outbreak we have decided to suspend service at least until Sunday April 5th. We will all be on standby carefully watching the news waiting for this to be contained and get back to walking your best friends! Stay safe everyone and wash your paws!

How To Walk Your Dog After Being Neutered or Spayed

 

If you’re not sure how to care for your dog after they’ve been neutered or spayed, you’re not alone! Most importantly, the best thing to do is follow your vets advice. While it is important for dogs to have rest during this time, it’s also important for pups to get back into their routine and get some light exercise in. Vets advise you to let your dog rest for up to 48 hours after neutering. Light short and slow walks just for them to do their business is fine until you bring your dog in for their 3-day check-up. Once the vet tells you your dog is recovering ok you can take them on short leash walks until they go back in for their 10-day check-up. Your vet may give your pup a cone to prevent him from irritating the surgical site, which can generally be removed for the walk and then reattached afterwards. It’s always best to follow your vets advice on when to remove the cone, and when the cone is removed it’s extremely important to watch your dog carefully so they don’t irritate the wound. There are also some alternatives to the cones the vet supplies which can be much more comfortable for your pup. Check some out here

After 48 hours, if you think your dog is feeling well enough, some light exercise is ok if you want to let them explore, but it’s important to keep an eye on them and discourage any over-hectic behavior. All dogs are different so you will need to make a call on this depending on how they appear to be recovering. After your pups surgery, you should schedule two check-ups with your vet so they can observe and monitor their recovery. The first will be three days after surgery and the second 10 days after. Rest is crucial during this time, so do your best to avoid any strenuous activity with your pup. The more time your pup has to heal, the better! Here is some advice from Dr. Michael Lund, veterinary staff manager at ASPCA Community Medicine, “If you are going to leave your dog alone after being neutered then keep him crated. If you don’t have a crate, a small room will do as the key here is to restrict their movement as much as possible in order to let the cut heal. I also recommend keeping your neutered or spayed dog away from any other pets in the house to reduce excitement, possible aggression and movement which could aggravate the wound.”

The most activity your pup should get in in the first 10 days after surgery is very light supervised exercise around the block. Try to keep your walks short and sweet! By the time you and your dog return to the vet for their 10-day check-up, your vet will likely give the all-clear for your furry friend to return to their normal activity levels if they’ve healed properly. On the off-chance your dog is having complications with the healing process, your vet may prescribe antibiotics or schedule further treatment if necessary. It’s important to keep in mind that if your dog moves around too much after their neutering procedure, the tissue which was cut may not heal properly. This has the potential to lead to the wounds recovering very slowly, so if you have a wiggly pup, try your best to keep an eye on them. The more your pup moves around, the harder it becomes for the affected tissue to heal. If this happens, it can also increase the risk of infection. 

The best thing you can do when taking care of your dog at home is to be present. Recovering pets need more attention from their owners. Spend as much time as you can with them, and let them know they’re loved by giving them a lot of cuddles and their favorite treats. If you aren’t able to take too much time off of work, you can instead schedule long visits with your pups favorite Swifto walker!, This can go a long way towards keeping your dog calm while recovering. The bottom line is; your dog is more than a pet, he’s a member of your family. When he comes out of surgery, he wants his best pal to be there for him as he recovers. Make sure to follow your vet’s instructions on limiting activity, even though it’s not always easy as most dogs will want to walk after neutering (just like any other day!). Give your puppy pal extra love and affection and make sure to follow up with your vet about any concerns you may have.This will ensure your dog recovers and returns to their happy and healthy self before long.